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#41 [url]

Dec 7 12 6:38 AM

Jack - fyi - I know we've been through this already and tests were done, but I tried to start a new topic and wasn't able to.  The hangup seems to be that it requires you to select a category.  But, in the dropdown box, it's all blank and no options.  Since you can't select anything, it won't let the message through to start the new topic.  Maybe its a glitch at the time and I'll try again later.... 

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#42 [url]

Dec 7 12 9:55 AM

I tried to start a new topic also, with the same results as Mr McGlinchey. Actually in one way I see these a not a problem, since it basically only allows one continuous thread. It more or less works the same way as the old forum, which results in this forum being easier to follow. There is no need to choose among many different topics. There is no reason why a individual just can't start their own new topic, using the existing thread. 

It appears as though, at this time, only the administrator of the forum is able to open new topics.











John Fleming Florida's favorite uncle Uncle Johnny

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#43 [url]

Dec 8 12 3:02 PM

Helen, your comment on my Christmas memory that brought you back to a time  "...when our lives seemed simple and orderly" got me thinking.  In retrospect it did seem that way, but we know it was more complex and difficult  than our lying memories want to remember.  Looking back it seems we lived in two worlds: one reality based and the other--spiritual/superstitious.  Unlike today, there was an answer for everything... that seemed to satisfy us.  If your foot itched, your were going traveling; if your ear was ringing, someone was talking about you; and if you were served with two forks, I think you were going to a wedding.  No small detail went without an answer.  Even my little, dirty Irish ears were told that they could grow potatoes in them, and Heaven forbid, don't ride in the back of trucks or you would fall out, like turnips,  onto Belflield Ave. and be squished.  And then there was that other world--the spirit realm-- whispered among our Mothers', and mesmerizing to me, about shadows of departed love ones passing in the house, or one's name called from the back of an empty church.  Fortunes were told, and believed, from leaves in a tea-cup.  I was not one to deny any of this as many of these predictions came true.  I'm feeling some of these spirits today reading Isabel Allende's page-turner, "The House of Spirits."  JBS was right about South American writers.  There is a really rich, passionate literary tradition down south, the equal of anything coming out of America or Europe.  And today, I feel connected to both worlds.  It's the feast day of the Immaculate Conception...and my Father's anniversary.  His passing on this date broke my Mother's heart and she followed him 15 months later--on his birthday date.  Spirits don't scare me.  After months of mourning Mom's passing, I clearly saw her apparition in a waking-dream state. All my sadness melted away.  This is what I understand as closure.--Kevin McKernan

Kevin Mc Kernan

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#44 [url]

Dec 10 12 12:07 PM

To let you know, I am still trying to open up new threads on the Germantown Forum site. I had another person working with me and still no luck. The thing that I can’t understand is why some people are able to do it, so far there have been 3 different people that have opened up another thread. As had been said, the thing about what we have now, is that the readings run in chronological  order and it is easy to follow and find. I will still check out opening threads in the future.

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#45 [url]

Dec 10 12 12:11 PM

I was always fascinated by the style of the many old churches you found in Germantown, partly because of their look of strength plus the difference in the architectural ornamentations that all merged together giving a kind of medievalism appearance. My favorite church building was St. Peter’s Episcopal Church on the 6000 block of Wayne Ave. To me it was like a cute building out of the Hobbits. A couple of months ago I was on a web site called philly.com and they were talking about an architect named Frank Furness who died in 1912. By reading more about Frank Furness I discovered that he was the architect of this church on Wayne Ave., he also did many of the train stations including Wayne Junction. He did a number of the buildings at the University of Pennsylvania, and his first commission was the Germantown Unitarian Church. I was sad to find out that the Church on Wayne Ave. is vacant. 

Jack McHugh

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#46 [url]

Dec 10 12 2:36 PM

Yes Jack McHugh, it's sad to see so many churches in the entire Philadelphia area going by the wayside. I guess, many others, such as myself, sort of took for granted these magnificent buildings, when we were children and attended services. It wasn't until we reached our maturity that we were able to admire the architecture of the churches we attended and all the others. I sometimes wonder what is to become of these grand churches.

John Fleming Florida's favorite uncle Uncle Johnny

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#47 [url]

Dec 12 12 6:03 AM


Here is a local story regarding the saving of a very old church near center city. Note that the cost would be six million to restore the church, but only one million to stabilize it. On a personal note, I once spoke to Fr Nevins, from good old CD high, in the rectory, when he was assigned to this parish about 20+ years ago.

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/local/20121212_Buyer_available_for_feeble_church_.html


Interior of Assumption Church.





John Fleming Florida's favorite uncle Uncle Johnny

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#48 [url]

Dec 23 12 4:29 PM

CHRISTMAS PAST---the box of candy from the pastor on the last day of school before Christmas vacation -the 50 cent pollyanna ---fear of the dreaded tin of Blue Waltz perfume  (50 cents at Wollworths )---family , friends FUN!!

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#49 [url]

Dec 23 12 6:12 PM

Thank you, Wintersolstice for reminding us how inexpensive but memorable Christmases were--back in the day.  It was all pretty good, wasn't it?  Your short note brought to mind one of my favorite Christmas Eve memories I would like to share.  I was young, new to California, a struggling student attempting to juggle work, school and a new love.  My psychology professor had invited many of us students/staff,  along with their dates, to a Christmas Eve dinner she hosted.  Most of us were strangers to each other, but after dinner and a few cocktails everyone loosened up.  It was about this time she explained an experiment she had in mind, an experiment that would stay with me the rest of my life.  She blindfolded us, separated everyone, and as the band played soft Christmas Carols, we were invited to seek out partners and experience others, on a rotational basis, using only our other senses.  I can still recall the many perfumes, the delicate feel of silk, the smell of liquor (and weed) on anonymous breaths, as well as the the smallest sounds and whispers.  Being blind heightened every other sense.  Sometimes you can feel better than you can see; you're less inhibited.  When this was over, when all the finals had been handed in, when all the shopping was done, my new love and I returned to out little Apt., cuddled on the sofa with only the small, twinkling lights of our "Charley Brown Christmas Tree" for light, and couldn't think of a better Christmas than this one...until next year.--Kevin


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Kevin Mc Kernan

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#51 [url]

Dec 25 12 3:27 PM



Many of us continue to ask "why all this gun carnage?"  How did we go from the homemade zip guns we built back in the sixties, but were afraid to fire because you could lose a hand or 'knock out an eye'... to today's free-fire zones?  We were fighters back in the day, not shooters, thank God!  No one died.  When I look at the profile of these new mass killers, I see disturbed individuals that couldn't punch their way out of a brown Acme bag.  Without their guns they are creepy punks... couldn't fill-out a small speedo.  I'm pointing the finger of blame where it belongs, where, in my opinion it all started:  Archie Bunker, a cartoonish character whose 70's fringe views have become a near majority view today.  God help us.  Please view the attached youtube video to confirm my diagnosis.  


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Kevin Mc Kernan

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#52 [url]

Dec 25 12 3:40 PM





My dear Kevin, fellow classmate of the class of '62 of good old CD high school. While you have the date right, the 70's, you have stated the wrong side of the fence as the reason for why we are where we are now. Yes, the show “All in the Family”, which was basically an un American show, was a factor, but it wasn't Archie's fault. Archie had basic great American values, that we all grew up with, but was shown as a buffoon, while liberal Mike, Meathead, was shown as representing the way things should be. That show made fun of everything American, including Veterans! It was just another example of how the media can be persuasive and control the minds of the populace. 










John Fleming Florida's favorite uncle Uncle Johnny

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#53 [url]

Dec 25 12 5:28 PM



John:  Sorry the video didn't come through.  I'll try again as you missed my point entirely.  It's just a simplistic parody; I'm not going all political on this site. BTW, Archie played a bigoted character in "All in the family."  It was a role, not the American lifestyle.  In real life (I met him in Hollywood), he was nothing like Archie in real life.  I just thought his "televised" view on Gun Control resembles what is being suggested by some today.  That's all.

Kevin Mc Kernan

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#54 [url]

Dec 25 12 5:49 PM



Hi Kevin,

I didn't miss your point, and in fact that video you posted is one that I posted on my facebook page. That video is a perfect example of what I was saying, in that Archie was shown as a buffoon. No on in their right mind would even suggest arming everyone that boards an aircraft. That video was orchestrated to make anyone that is against gun control, to look silly and out of their minds.  I would strongly suggest that most members of the NRA, would be for some form of “sensible” gun control. The fact is that states now have the power to regulate guns and ammunition. Unfortunately politicians use the gun control issue as a political football. Some states are tougher then others. To think that getting rid of all guns will cut down on murder is just simply silly.



John Fleming Florida's favorite uncle Uncle Johnny

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#55 [url]

Dec 27 12 11:47 AM

Christmas 2012 has come and gone, and once again, there was no Red Ryder BB gun under the tree (Thank God!).  However, there were plenty of warm socks, ties, shirts and underwear.  Unlike when we received these items as children and said Ugh!  I have now become quite fond of these gifts and exclaim: YES!  Way to go!!....  Helen, I hope your Christmas Eve fish Vigil went well.  We observed the Eve with fish as well--but just one type--Swai.  I asked an Italian/Irish couple at church if they observed this tradition and they did.  Jokingly I inquired if they did 7, 9 or 11 different types.  She said: "No Way!"  I asked her if she snuck a few Mrs Smith's Fish Sticks into her arrangement and she gave me major "stink-eye."  She obviously didn't appreciate Germantown's love affair with Mrs Smith's little Deviled Crab Cakes, Eh?  Brother Bernie still does dynamite crab cakes, from scratch, that are to die for.  I sincerely hope our missing friends from the Hollow: JB, Payne, Hollow Girl and the barb,Baggs had a merry little Christmas.  The Bor and his mother would have been proud of the way this Irish/Jew bargained for his gifts this season. I left nothing at the Temple. still able to keep the mustard on my pretzel.  So, to Dennis who is probably off gathering material on Philly Churches' and theaters' for our future enlightenment,  and John F. who may be still be at sea defending the Republic, I wish you all (mentioned and unmentioned) a good, safe New Year and look forward to your future contributions to OUR site.--Kevin McKernan   

Kevin Mc Kernan

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#56 [url]

Dec 27 12 4:07 PM

Mrs Smiths fish sticks and crab cakes???? Hey Kevin, still hitting the Egg Nog LOL? I think you mean Mrs. Paul’s fish sticks, the favorite of most Catholic School children during Lent in the 50's. Mrs. Smith made the pies, and really great ones also. I lived near their bakery on North 7th street, in Logan, and frequently went there for “culled” pies. Loved the Boston Cream pies the best!

I just got back from our local supermarket,Publix, which is really a great place to shop, they do everything right. I was looking for some Mrs Pauls crab cakes, but they didn't carry them. They did, however have the fish sticks.









John Fleming Florida's favorite uncle Uncle Johnny

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#57 [url]

Dec 27 12 4:33 PM

Years ago I was in Mexico during the Christmas season, the traditional meal was fish served on Christmas Eve night (real late at night) actually you might say it is the beginning of Christmas Day. In spanish the fish was called bacalao, anyway the fish sold for 10X’s what other fish sold for. Well I figured it was some kind of special rare fish used at Christmas, then one day walking in the supermarket I saw it packed dry in wooden crates that were marked COD FISH product of Canada

Jack McHugh

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#58 [url]

Dec 27 12 5:36 PM

John:  Burp!  You're quite correct about Mrs Paul's Crab Cakes.  How soon we forget after fifty years, and besides,  I always had difficulty with those darn Anglo Saxon, monosyllabic names like Smith and Paul, throw in a jones and I'm really confused.  :-)  I  was partial to those crab cakes but never figured out the mystery stuffing.  Did anyone ever encounter a piece of crab in one?...I didn't.  John, your supermarket looks like a hotel.  Ours still have plants, flowers and watermelons outside and bear some resemblance to our old Acme and Penn Fruit stores.  And they always carry crab cakes and Boston Cream Pies for us expatriates....Jack McHugh, I'm not surprised at your cod story.  When I was in the far East I became addicted to salty, dried Octopus--kinda of like jerky--along with Oriental Beer.  When I looked up what octopus was selling for here, I said "forgetaboutit." 

Kevin Mc Kernan

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#59 [url]

Dec 27 12 6:13 PM

I always judge a Jersey diner, by their crab cakes. Without fail, if the crab cakes are good, then the rest of the menu will be acceptable. Of course the best I have had was on our annual Summer vacation in Maryland!
Crab cakes 10

John Fleming Florida's favorite uncle Uncle Johnny

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#60 [url]

Dec 28 12 6:14 AM

Kevin, looks like your post was full of senior moments…..Mrs. Smith’s fishcakes and me the provider of church enlightenment.  If you check those church posts, you’ll see the author being some folks other than me.  Sorry, no church enlightenment from this front.


Helen, loved hearing you still do the feast of the seven fishes.  It’s nice to see those wonderful old traditions kept alive.  The one traditional fish I never had, but doubt I could handle it, is smelts.   Just don’t like the look of those things….   My Mom always served fish on Christmas Eve, just flounder or cod.  I don’t know if it was an Irish thing, but she said it is what she grew up with on Christmas Eve and my grandparents were from the old country.  That was our feast of the seven fishes, for five kids and two adults…. 


I’ll be offline until after the New Year.  Hope everyone has a great 2013.  Go out and bang a pot like we did to ring in the New Year back in our Germantown days….



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